March 05, 2019

Hidden Treasures in the Woods - From our Director

Frederic Bastiat, a French classical liberal theorist who influenced American political thought, popularized a simple—but revolutionary—idea regarding what is seen and “what is not seen”. Bastiat wrote:

“an act, a habit, an institution, a law, gives birth not only to an effect but to a series of effects. Of these effects, the first only is immediate; it manifests itself simultaneously with its cause—it is seen. The others unfold in succession—they are not seen… it almost always happens that when the immediate consequence is favorable, the ultimate consequences are fatal, and the converse.”

While Bastiat was referencing economic policy in the above quote, it perfectly describes the theme of Into the Woods, the Pacifica Christian High School spring production. Familiar fairy tale characters work to attain their hearts’ desires, sacrificing certain moral principles in the process. Audiences witness the terrible risk taken when humanity decides what is right and wrong for itself, without core values and a sense of God’s divine presence. The result is destructive. It is an accepted truth that we reap the consequences of our choices. Poor choices, selfish choices, sinful choices, ultimately lead to despair. The unseen consequences of poor moral choices is a strong theme in the Pacifica production of Into the Woods.

In Act I, audiences are treated to an array of familiar and beloved fairy tales. Act II refutes the “Happily ever after” endings of modern fairy tales, as the poor choices of the characters lead to utter chaos. The lavish costumes, foot stomping, lyrically beautiful music, and lavish set highlight the theme in a comfortable, safe manner.

The audience will recognize that it is the willful choices made by the play’s characters that determine their fate. If we choose virtue, if children listen to their parents, and if parents are worthy examples, the world can be a hopeful place—and with grace and truth from God, the journey “into the woods” of life will be victorious. It will be difficult, and it will be worth it.

Audiences will love Pacifica’s fanciful retelling of this classic and beloved musical and will hopefully be filled with a warm outpouring of familial love. Conversations over post-show dessert can plant in hearts and minds the importance of embracing the unwavering and timeless principles of right and wrong.

Angela Ward
Director of Performing Arts